November 11, 2011
"North of the Sea", Beihai, China.

"North of the Sea", Beihai, China.

Who protects Yemei women from the crimes of the thugs?
Sana’a, Yemen, at dusk.
"The 7 Fastest Growing Cities in the World", Foreign Policy. 26 October 2011

Who protects Yemei women from the crimes of the thugs?

Sana’a, Yemen, at dusk.

"The 7 Fastest Growing Cities in the World", Foreign Policy. 26 October 2011

(Source: Guardian)

November 7, 2011
A Chinese Barbeque.

A Chinese Barbeque.

August 30, 2011
"Women want peace, but what they fear is that their rights will be the currency for any negotiation."

- “A Peace Penalty for Afghan Women?”, Interview, Gayle Lemmon, deputy director of the Women and Foreign Policy Program at CFR

"Women want peace, but what they fear is that their rights will be the currency for any negotiation."

- “A Peace Penalty for Afghan Women?”, Interview, Gayle Lemmon, deputy director of the Women and Foreign Policy Program at CFR

(Source: cfr.org)

August 17, 2011

When explanations further confuse

Standard & Poor’s explains their rationale behind lowering the long-term sovereign credit rating of the United States:

"We lowered our long-term rating on the U.S. because we believe that the prolonged controversy over raising the statutory debt ceiling and the related fiscal policy debate indicate that further near-term progress containing the growth in public spending, especially on entitlements, or on reaching an agreement on raising revenues is less likely than we previously assumed and will remain a contentious and fitful process."

Longest sentence ever.

(Source: cfr.org)

August 16, 2011
"Yes, this was the one incident which defined our lives henceforth. But  in all the struggles that followed, we never, not for one moment, bore  bitterness or hatred for the person who actually pulled the trigger and  caused my father’s death. The fact that this all happened in the  confusion of a tragic war was never lost to us. We are all pawns in this  terrible game of war and peace." — Farida Singh, in reply to Qais Hussain’s e-mail letter, "Condolence".
"Pakistani Pilot reaches out to daughter of Indian man he shot down", CNN, 15 August 2011

"Back in Islamabad", photo by sufined.

"Yes, this was the one incident which defined our lives henceforth. But in all the struggles that followed, we never, not for one moment, bore bitterness or hatred for the person who actually pulled the trigger and caused my father’s death. The fact that this all happened in the confusion of a tragic war was never lost to us. We are all pawns in this terrible game of war and peace." — Farida Singh, in reply to Qais Hussain’s e-mail letter, "Condolence".

"Pakistani Pilot reaches out to daughter of Indian man he shot down", CNN, 15 August 2011

"Back in Islamabad", photo by sufined.

(Source: CNN)

August 2, 2011
"Every winter, districts in Kabul held a kite-fighting tournament. And if  you were a boy living in Kabul, the day of the tournament was  undeniably the highlight of the cold season. I never slept the night  before the tournament. I’d roll from side to side, make shadow animals  on the wall, even sit on the balcony in the dark, a blanket wrapped  around me. I felt like a soldier trying to sleep in the trenches the  night before a major battle. And that wasn’t so far off. In Kabul,  fighting kites was a little like going to war."- Khaled Hosseini, The Kite Runner
A boy flies a kite in an area northwest of Kabul known to be littered with IEDs and under Taliban control. Photo essay: See no Evil by Omar Mullick, Foreign Policy, 1 August 2011

"Every winter, districts in Kabul held a kite-fighting tournament. And if you were a boy living in Kabul, the day of the tournament was undeniably the highlight of the cold season. I never slept the night before the tournament. I’d roll from side to side, make shadow animals on the wall, even sit on the balcony in the dark, a blanket wrapped around me. I felt like a soldier trying to sleep in the trenches the night before a major battle. And that wasn’t so far off. In Kabul, fighting kites was a little like going to war."- Khaled Hosseini, The Kite Runner

A boy flies a kite in an area northwest of Kabul known to be littered with IEDs and under Taliban control. Photo essay: See no Evil by Omar Mullick, Foreign Policy, 1 August 2011

Description: A citizen on the bus acted in this way to remind people of the event. 07/26/2011, Hangzhou.
- Photo by Leon Wong on Flickr
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“If a higher-level leader died,” [a distinguished Chinese actor] wrote, “there would be countless  wreaths; however, when many ordinary people died, there was only endless  harmony”.
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The host of one news program on CCTV asked, “If nobody can be safe, do we still want this speed? Can we drink a  glass of milk that’s safe? Can we stay in an apartment that will not  collapse?”
"China, please slow down," the host said. "If you’re too fast, you may leave the souls of your people behind".
"Media Black Out After Wreck", New York Times, 31 July 2011
"In Baring Facts of Train Crash, Blogs Erode China Censorship", New York Times, 28 July 2011

Description: A citizen on the bus acted in this way to remind people of the event. 07/26/2011, Hangzhou.

- Photo by Leon Wong on Flickr

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.

“If a higher-level leader died,” [a distinguished Chinese actor] wrote, “there would be countless wreaths; however, when many ordinary people died, there was only endless harmony”.

.

.

The host of one news program on CCTV asked, “If nobody can be safe, do we still want this speed? Can we drink a glass of milk that’s safe? Can we stay in an apartment that will not collapse?”

"China, please slow down," the host said. "If you’re too fast, you may leave the souls of your people behind".

"Media Black Out After Wreck", New York Times, 31 July 2011

"In Baring Facts of Train Crash, Blogs Erode China Censorship", New York Times, 28 July 2011

(Source: The New York Times)

There is still so much to discover.
If we preserve what we’ve got,
we have a chance to find it.

(Source: osocio.org)

August 1, 2011
"Iraq remains an extraordinarily dangerous place to work," Stuart W. Bowen Jr., the U.S. special inspector general for Iraq reconstruction, wrote in his quarterly report to Congress and the Obama administration. "It is less safe, in my judgment, than 12 months ago."
"Iraq more dangerous than a year ago, U.S. review finds," Washington Post, 30 July 2011

"Iraq remains an extraordinarily dangerous place to work," Stuart W. Bowen Jr., the U.S. special inspector general for Iraq reconstruction, wrote in his quarterly report to Congress and the Obama administration. "It is less safe, in my judgment, than 12 months ago."

"Iraq more dangerous than a year ago, U.S. review finds," Washington Post, 30 July 2011

(Source: Washington Post)